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Kidney in Essential Hypertension

Proceedings of the Course on the Kidney in Essential Hypertension held at New Orleans, Louisiana, March 18–19, 1983

  • Franz H. Messerli

Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 35)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. The Kidney in the Pathogenesis of Essential Hypertension

    1. Nick C. Trippodo
      Pages 15-23
    2. John C. McGiff
      Pages 43-54
    3. Harry S. Margolius, Julie Chao, Alan W. Cuthbert
      Pages 55-64
    4. John E. Hall, Arthur C. Guyton, Joey P. Granger, Thomas G. Coleman
      Pages 87-103
  3. The Kidney as a Target Organ in Essential Hypertension

    1. Friedrich C. Luft, M. H. Weinberger
      Pages 105-123
    2. Efrain Reisin, Franz H. Messerli, Hector O. Ventura, Edward D. Frohlich
      Pages 125-129
    3. E. D. Frohlich, F. H. Messerli, F. G. Dunn
      Pages 149-156
  4. Antihypertensive Treatment and the Kidney

About this book

Introduction

The kidney, similar to the heart, plays a three-fold role in essential hypertension. First, it participates in the patho­ genesis of arterial hypertension. Second, it suffers as a target organ of long-standing hypertension, and third, it experiences the effects of antihypertensive therapy. Perhaps most contested at the present time is the involvement of the kidney in the patho­ genesis of essential hypertension. More than a century ago, William Osler put forward three basic hypotheses about the "genuine contracted kidney. "l 1. "The hypertrophy can be regarded as an effect to overcome a sort of stop-cock action of the vessels when under the influence of an irritating ingredient in the blood greatly contracted and increased the peripheral resistance. " Clearly this hypothesis of an "irritating ingredient" is perhaps the most convincing nowadays, and numerous attempts have been made to identify a specific vasoconstrictive agent in the blood in essential hypertension. 2. "The obliteration of a large number of capillary territories in the kidney materially raised the arterial pressure. An additional factor of dimin­ ished excretion of water also heightened the pressure within the blood vessel. " Today we know that fluid volume overload in the presence of reduced renal mass seems to be the most likely mechanism accoun­ ting for renal parenchymal hypertension and, as shown by Guyton's group, for certain forms of experimental hypertension. 3.

Keywords

arterial pressure cardiovascular cardiovascular regulation heart hemodynamics hypertension kidney

Editors and affiliations

  • Franz H. Messerli
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Hemodynamic LaboratoryOchsner Clinic and Alton Ochsner Medical FoundationNew OrleansUSA
  2. 2.Tulane University School of MedicineNew OrleansUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-3897-0
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1984
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4613-3899-4
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4613-3897-0
  • Series Print ISSN 0166-9842
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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