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The Kidney in Pregnancy

  • Vittorio E. Andreucci

Part of the Topics in Renal Medicine book series (TIRM, volume 1)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xviii
  2. Antonio Dal Canton, Vittorio E. Andreucci
    Pages 1-11
  3. Gina Gregorini, Norberto Perico, Giuseppe Remuzzi
    Pages 13-33
  4. Edoardo Rossi, Maria Matilde Cossu, Piero Capetta
    Pages 35-45
  5. James R. Taylor, Benjamin H. Spargo
    Pages 47-63
  6. Wolfram E. Nolten, Edward N. Ehrlich
    Pages 81-94
  7. Norman F. Gant, Jack A. Pritchard
    Pages 95-121
  8. Vittorio E. Andreucci, Antonio Dal Canton, Domenico Russo
    Pages 123-131
  9. Priscilla S. Kincaid-Smith, Robyn A. North, Gavin J. Becker, Kenneth F. Fairley
    Pages 133-164
  10. Nathalie Pertuiset, Dominique Ganeval, Jean-Pierre Grünfeld
    Pages 165-184
  11. Sabri Challah, Antony J. Wing, Michel Broyer, Gianfranco Rizzoni
    Pages 185-194
  12. Israel Penn
    Pages 195-204
  13. Iain R. McFadyen
    Pages 205-229
  14. Back Matter
    Pages 231-237

About this book

Introduction

The behavior of the kidney in normal pregnancy, as well as in complicated pregnancy, is a very interesting, but still in many ways an unknown topic in renal medicine. It is undoubtedly difficult to determine, even in normal women, the behavior of renal hemodynamics throughout gestation, since the fear of impairing a new life (i.e., the fetus's life) will limit, for ethical reasons, the use or the frequent repetition of diagnostic tests on the mother. On the other hand, the study of complicated pregnancy even for diagnostic purposes (for planning adequate treatment), except in a few countries that are known for the advanced health education of the population, has to face serious difficulties. First of all, pregnant women usually seek the help of an obstetrician when gestation is already in an advanced stage. This makes it difficult to determine when and how asymptomatic signs of any disease discovered during pregnancy have first occurred. A second difficulty is that frequently the patient does not know whether a given disease has preceded pregnancy. Pregnancy is a condition of young women, and a young woman frequently has never seen a physician; thus, no urine analysis or blood tests have been performed before the gestation. Not infrequently, even blood pressure has never been measured. This will make it difficult to classify hypertension discovered in late pregnancy as pregnancy-induced hypertension or as chronic hypertension in pregnancy.

Keywords

dialysis infection kidney pregnancy transplantation

Editors and affiliations

  • Vittorio E. Andreucci
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Nephrology, Second Faculty of MedicineUniversity of NaplesNaplesItaly

Bibliographic information

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