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Compiler Construction

  • William M. Waite
  • Gerhard Goos

Part of the Texts and Monographs in Computer Science book series (MCS)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiv
  2. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 1-14
  3. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 15-45
  4. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 46-84
  5. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 85-101
  6. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 102-134
  7. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 135-148
  8. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 149-182
  9. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 183-219
  10. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 220-252
  11. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 253-281
  12. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 282-301
  13. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 302-325
  14. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 326-357
  15. William M. Waite, Gerhard Goos
    Pages 358-382
  16. Back Matter
    Pages 382-447

About this book

Introduction

Compilers and operating systems constitute the basic interfaces between a programmer and the machine for which he is developing software. In this book we are concerned with the construction of the former. Our intent is to provide the reader with a firm theoretical basis for compiler construction and sound engineering principles for selecting alternate methods, imple­ menting them, and integrating them into a reliable, economically viable product. The emphasis is upon a clean decomposition employing modules that can be re-used for many compilers, separation of concerns to facilitate team programming, and flexibility to accommodate hardware and system constraints. A reader should be able to understand the questions he must ask when designing a compiler for language X on machine Y, what tradeoffs are possible, and what performance might be obtained. He should not feel that any part of the design rests on whim; each decision must be based upon specific, identifiable characteristics of the source and target languages or upon design goals of the compiler. The vast majority of computer professionals will never write a compiler. Nevertheless, study of compiler technology provides important benefits for almost everyone in the field . • It focuses attention on the basic relationships between languages and machines. Understanding of these relationships eases the inevitable tran­ sitions to new hardware and programming languages and improves a person's ability to make appropriate tradeoft's in design and implementa­ tion .

Keywords

Clean algorithms compiler constraint data structures programming language selection

Authors and affiliations

  • William M. Waite
    • 1
  • Gerhard Goos
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Institut für Informatik IIUniversität KarlsruheWest Germany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-5192-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 1984
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4612-9731-4
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4612-5192-7
  • Series Print ISSN 0172-603X
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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