Advertisement

Understanding the Universe

An Introduction to Physics and Astrophysics

  • James B. Seaborn

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 1-15
  3. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 16-32
  4. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 33-53
  5. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 54-68
  6. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 69-81
  7. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 82-88
  8. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 89-103
  9. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 104-112
  10. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 113-126
  11. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 127-147
  12. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 148-155
  13. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 156-160
  14. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 161-171
  15. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 172-186
  16. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 187-195
  17. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 196-217
  18. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 218-232
  19. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 233-248
  20. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 249-265
  21. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 266-276
  22. James B. Seaborn
    Pages 277-284
  23. Back Matter
    Pages 285-304

About this book

Introduction

For the last eighteen years, I have been teaching an introductory course in as­ trophysics. The course is intended for nonscience majors satisfying a general education requirement in natural science. It is a physics course with applications in astronomy. The only prerequisite is the high school mathematics required for ad­ mission to the university. For a number of years, I used an astronomy text, which I supplemented with lecture notes on physics. There are many good astronomy texts available, but this was not a satisfactory state of affairs, since the course is a physics course. The students needed a physics text that focused on astronomical applications. Over the last few years, I have developed a text which my students have been using in manuscript form in this course. This book is an outgrowth of that effort. The purpose of the book is to develop the physics that describes the behavior of matter here on the earth and use it to try to understand the things that are seen in the heavens. Following a brief discussion of the history of astronomy from the Greeks through the Copernican Revolution, we begin to develop the physics needed to understand three important problems at a level accessible to undergraduate nonscience majors: (1) the solar system, (2) the structure and evolution of stars, and (3) the early universe. All ofthese are related to the fundamental problem of how matter and energy behave in space and time.

Keywords

Atom Cosmology Universe astrophysics electricity magnetism mechanics

Authors and affiliations

  • James B. Seaborn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of RichmondRichmondUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-0689-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1998
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4612-6868-0
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4612-0689-7
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
Industry Sectors
Oil, Gas & Geosciences