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© 1990

Drug Discovery

A Casebook and Analysis

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxv
  2. Cardiovascular and Renal Group (Including Renal Transplantation)

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 3-18
    3. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 19-34
    4. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 35-51
    5. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 53-65
    6. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 67-77
    7. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 79-94
    8. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 95-108
  3. Psychiatry Group

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 109-109
    2. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 111-122
    3. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 123-132
    4. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 133-141
    5. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 143-154
    6. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 155-164
    7. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 165-175
  4. Neurology Group

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 177-177
    2. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 179-191
    3. Robert A. Maxwell, Shohreh B. Eckhardt
      Pages 193-206
  5. Rheumatology Group

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 207-207

About this book

Introduction

This treatise had its origins in the authors' strong opinion that the discovery of new drugs, especially of innovative therapeutic agents, really does not happen as a spontaneous sequel to investiga­ tive research, no matter how penetrating such research may be. Rather, it seemed to us that the discovery of innovative therapeutic agents was a very active process, existing in and of itself, and demanding full attention-it was not simply a passive, dependent by-process of investigative research. And yet, many researchers­ some close confreres of the authors, others more distant-believed otherwise. We felt that their view reflected unrealistic thinking and that reality probably lay closer to what Beyer" maintained: We are taught to believe that if we can understand a disease it should be easy enough to figure out, say, the molecular configuration of a definitive receptor mechanism somewhere along the line and to design a specific drug . . . . And so we start out to understand the disease but never get around to doing much about therapy. The authors very soon realized that there was essentially no quantitive information available on just where and how innovative therapeutic agents were discovered. There were only anecdotal accounts, and these were able to be selected and presented in ways that could be used to defend any point of view.

Keywords

calcium clinical research drug drug discovery research transplantation

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.The Wellcome Research LaboratoriesResearch Triangle ParkUSA
  2. 2.University of Vermont College of MedicineBurlingtonUSA

Bibliographic information

  • Book Title Drug Discovery
  • Book Subtitle A Casebook and Analysis
  • Authors Robert A. Maxwell
    Shohreh B. Eckhardt
  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-0469-5
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990
  • Publisher Name Humana Press, Totowa, NJ
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Hardcover ISBN 978-0-89603-180-7
  • Softcover ISBN 978-1-4612-6775-1
  • eBook ISBN 978-1-4612-0469-5
  • Edition Number 1
  • Number of Pages XXV, 438
  • Number of Illustrations 0 b/w illustrations, 0 illustrations in colour
  • Topics Pharmacology/Toxicology
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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