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User-Centred Design of Systems

  • Jan Noyes
  • Chris Baber

Part of the Applied Computing book series (APPLCOMP)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Defining Systems

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 3-15
    3. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 17-36
    4. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 37-53
    5. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 55-79
  3. Developing Systems

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 81-81
    2. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 83-102
    3. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 103-118
    4. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 119-134
    5. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 135-145
    6. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 147-164
  4. Deploying Systems

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 165-165
    2. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 167-184
    3. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 185-194
    4. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 195-196
    5. Jan Noyes, Chris Baber
      Pages 197-217
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 219-222

About this book

Introduction

System design has conventionally been the province of engineers, and the approaches taken to the design of systems have conventionally led to formal specification of the system. The past decade or two has seen the rise of another approach, that of human-computer interaction (HCI). Given the number of incidents and accidents which are attributed to 'human error', it is sensible to develop an approach to system design which views humans as an essential element in the system. Thus, an important aspect of designing systems is the study of the interaction between humans and the technology that they use. In terms of bringing computers and computing to a wide audience, the 1980s were the boom years. The first personal computer (PC) was launched onto the market in February 1978, and since then, PCs have become a common-place feature of our homes, offices, schools, retail outlets, hospitals, banks, etc. Within Western society today, there are very few organisations that have not been infiltrated by computer technology, and few individuals who have not had experience of computers. However, the increase in use of computers has not been matched with a corresponding spread of training of users; much of the human-computer interaction research has sought to design systems which do not require special training, i. e. which people can simply walk up to and use. Not surprisingly, this has resulted in a number of difficulties; some of which have yet to be satisfactorily resolved.

Keywords

Design Interaction SPICE computer human-computer interaction (HCI) system

Authors and affiliations

  • Jan Noyes
    • 1
  • Chris Baber
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of BristolBristolUK
  2. 2.School of Manufacturing and Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of BirminghamEdgbaston, BirminghamUK

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-0537-4
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag London Limited 1999
  • Publisher Name Springer, London
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-540-76007-8
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4471-0537-4
  • Series Print ISSN 1431-1542
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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