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Melanocortins: Multiple Actions and Therapeutic Potential

  • Anna Catania

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 681)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xx
  2. Anamika Singh, Erica M. Haslach, Carrie Haskell-Luevano
    Pages 1-18
  3. Paula C. Eves, John W. Haycock
    Pages 19-28
  4. Jay W. Schaub, Erin B. Bruce, Carrie Haskell-Luevano
    Pages 49-60
  5. Daniela Giuliani, Alessandra Ottani, Domenica Altavilla, Carla Bazzani, Francesco Squadrito, Salvatore Guarini
    Pages 71-87
  6. Hetal B. Patel, Giovanna Leoni, Trinidad Montero Melendez, André L. F. Sampaio, Mauro Perretti
    Pages 88-106
  7. Thomas Brzoska, Markus Böhm, Andreas Lügering, Karin Loser, Thomas A. Luger
    Pages 107-116
  8. Stefano Gatti, Caterina Lonati, Andrea Sordi, Anna Catania
    Pages 117-125
  9. Alex N. Eberle, Jean-Philippe Bapst, Martine Calame, Heidi Tanner, Sylvie Froidevaux
    Pages 133-142
  10. Andrew W. Taylor, Darren Lee
    Pages 143-149
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 151-153

About this book

Introduction

It is clear that the melanocortins are of immense academic interest. Further, these molecules have remarkable potential as pharmaceutical agents for treatment of multiple human and veterinary disorders and diseases. The evidence to support academic interest and clinical applications lies in significant part within the chapters of this book, chapters written by noted experts in the field who have worked diligently to understand the molecules and to move them toward clinical applications. I personally believe that the - MSH molecule and its derivatives will be used as routine therapeutics in the very near future. My belief is so strong that I left academia to form a company based on -MSH analogs and have caused millions of dollars to be spent on melanocortin research. Now why would a sane professor pick up such a challenge and enter business, an essential step toward any clinical application? It is the - MSH story that drove me. Consider that - MSH occurs in exactly the same amino acid sequence in humans and in the sea lamprey, an organism unchanged since its appearance during the Pennsylvanian period of the Paleozoic era (about 300 million years ago—way before dinosaurs were to be considered). There is unpublished evidence that the stability of the molecule can be traced back a half billion years. Frankly, I believe that the molecule existed even when single cells began to live together.

Keywords

Catania Hormone Hypothalamus Melanocortin Melanocortins Molecules chemistry drug discovery drugs inflammation peptides pharmacology proteins research transplantation

Editors and affiliations

  • Anna Catania
    • 1
  1. 1.Fondazione IRCCSCenter for Preclinical InvestigationMilanoItaly

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-6354-3
  • Copyright Information Landes Bioscience and Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4419-6353-6
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4419-6354-3
  • Series Print ISSN 0065-2598
  • Buy this book on publisher's site
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