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© 1998

South Africa in Transition

New Theoretical Perspectives

  • David R. Howarth
  • Aletta J. Norval
Book

About this book

Introduction

South Africa in Transition utilises new theoretical perspectives to describe and explain central dimensions of the democratic transition in South Africa during the late 1980s and early 1990s, covering changes in the politics of gender and education, the political discourses of the ANC, NP and the white right, constructions of identity in South Africa's black townships and rural areas, the role of political violence in the transition, and accounts of the democratization process itself.

Keywords

democracy democratization gender politics socialism violence

Editors and affiliations

  • David R. Howarth
    • 1
  • Aletta J. Norval
    • 2
  1. 1.Staffordshire UniversityUK
  2. 2.University of EssexUK

About the editors

ANTONY ALTBEKKER Deputy Director General of the Department of Finance in South Africa DEBBY BONNIN Department of Sociology, University of Natal, Durban ROGER DEACON Education Department, University of Natal, Durban MARK DEVENNEY Doctoral Student, University of Essex ANDRIES DU TOIT Director of a Research Project on land reform and its policy implications in South Africa SEAN FIELD Currently involved in setting up an oral History Research Project in Cape Town, South Africa DARYL GLASER teaches Political Theory, University of Strathclyde DAVID HOWARTH Teaches Political Theory, University of Staffordshire ROBERT MORREL teaches History and Gender-related courses, Education Department, University of Natal, Durban ALETTA NORVAL Director of the MA programme in Ideology and Discourse Theory, University of Essex BEN PARKER Chair of the Department of Education, University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg JENNIFER ROBINSON Department of Geography, London School of Economics MARK SHAW Senior Researcher and Head of the Crime and Police Policy, Institute for Security Studies, Johannesburg JONNY STEINBERG Doctoral student, Oxford University RUPERT TAYLOR Department of Political Science, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

Bibliographic information