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© 2006

The Emerging Physics of Consciousness

  • Jack A. Tuszynski
  • Addresses the nature of consciousness: one of the major unsolved questions in science

  • Proceeds from the assumption that consciousness can be understood using the intellectual potential of modern physics and other sciences

  • Reviews competing theories of consciousness, some based on classical physics while others require the use of quantum concepts

  • Presents a spectrum of opinions in this on-going scientific debate, allowing readers to decide for themselves which of the approaches are most likely to succeed

Book

Part of the The Frontiers Collection book series (FRONTCOLL)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XV
  2. Jack A. Tuszynski, Nancy Woolf
    Pages 1-26
  3. Andreas Mershin, Hugo Sanabria, John H. Miller, Dharmakeerthna Nawarathna, Efthimios M. C. Skoulakis, Nikolaos E. Mavromatos et al.
    Pages 95-170
  4. Alwyn Scott
    Pages 171-191
  5. Avner Priel, Jack A. Tuszynski, Horacion F. Cantiello
    Pages 293-325
  6. Laxmidhar Behera, Indrani Kar, Avshalom C. Elitzur
    Pages 327-350
  7. Elizabeth C. Behrman, K. Gaddam, J. E. Steck, S. R. Skinner
    Pages 351-370
  8. Gordon Globus
    Pages 371-385
  9. Back Matter
    Pages 483-487

About this book

Introduction

Consciousness remains one of the major unsolved problems in science. How do the feelings and sensations making up conscious experience arise from the concerted actions of nerve cells and their associated synaptic and molecular processes? Can such feelings be explained by modern science, or is there an entirely different kind of explanation needed? And how can this seemingly intractable problem be approached experimentally? How do the operations of the conscious mind emerge out of the specific interactions involving billions of neurons? This book seeks answers to these questions on the underlying assumption that consciousness can be understood using the intellectual potential of modern physics and other sciences. There are a number of theories of consciousness, some based on classical physics while others require the use of quantum concepts. The latter ones have drawn criticism from the parts of the scientific establishment while simultaneously claiming that classical approaches are doomed to failure. The contributing authors present a spectrum of opinions from both sides of this on-going scientific debate, allowing readers to decide for themselves which of the approaches are most likely to succeed.

Keywords

Experiment Memory Potential The Conscious cells cognition cortex logic mechanics metabolism neural network neurobiology neurophysiology physiology quantum mechanics

Editors and affiliations

  • Jack A. Tuszynski
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

About the editors

Professor Jack Tuszynski received his M.Sc. with distinction in Physics from the University of Poznan (Poland) in 1980. He received his Ph.D. in Condensed Matter Physics from the University of Calgary in 1983. He held a Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the University of Calgary Chemistry Department in 1983. He was an Assistant Professor at the Department of Physics of the Memorial University of Newfoundland from 1983 to 1988, and at the University of Alberta Physics Department from 1988 to 1990. He joined the University of Alberta Physics Department in 1993. He is on the editorial board of the Journal of Biological Physics.

Bibliographic information

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Reviews

From the reviews:

“The intention of the book was clearly to present many different views of the consciousness problem, and as such it succeeds extremely well. … If you are interested in consciousness and its interaction with the physical and biological worlds, this is an excellent book that I recommend highly.” (Philosophy, Religion and Science Book Reviews, bookinspections.wordpress.com, March, 2014)