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© 2006

Wiki

Web Collaboration

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-6
  2. The Wiki Concept

    1. Pages 9-30
  3. Our First Wiki

    1. Pages 33-42
    2. Pages 43-50
    3. Pages 63-74
    4. Pages 75-100
    5. Pages 117-132
    6. Pages 133-143
  4. TWiki, the Jack of all Trades

    1. Pages 147-165
    2. Pages 167-180
    3. Pages 181-192
    4. Pages 193-203
    5. Pages 219-232
    6. Pages 233-252
  5. TWiki as a Project Kit

About this book

Introduction

About the Authors
Anja Ebersbach studied Information Science, History and English. She has filled various teaching positions at a variety of universities and technical colleges, and is active as a freelance IT trainer. She is currently working on her doctorate.
Markus Glaser studied Information Science, English and Psychology. He is currently working as a scientific assistant at the library of the University of Regensburg and has just begun working on his doctorate on Web-Based Collaborative Processes.
Richard Heigl studied History and German Philology. He completed his doctorate in Contemporary History. He is a freelance instructor for communication training and software applications, and works as a consultant on organizational development.
Wiki - Web Collaboration
Wikis are Web-based applications that allow all users not only to view pages but also to change them. The recent success of the Internet encyclopedia Wikipedia has drawn increasing attention from private users, small organizations and enterprises to the various possible uses of wikis.
Their simple structure and straightforward operation make them a serious alternative to expensive content management systems and also provide a basis for many applications in the area of collaborative work. We show the practical use of wikis in carrying out projects for users as well as for maintainers. This includes a step-by-step introduction to wiki philosophy, social effects and functions, a survey of their controls and components, and the installation and configuration of the wiki clones MediaWiki and TWiki. In order to exemplify the possibilities of the software, we use it as a project tool for planning a conference.
Features & Benefits
* Introduces two of the most popular wiki engines
* Explores the wealth of possiblities with task-oriented examples
* Provides an overview of social and philosophical issues

 

 

Keywords

collaboration content management content management system information system internet project work webbased collaboration

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.RegensburgGermany
  2. 2.RegensburgGermany
  3. 3.RegensburgGermany

About the authors

Anja Ebersbach studied Information Science, History and English. She has filled various teaching positions at a variety of universities and technical colleges, and is active as a freelance IT trainer. She is currently working on her doctorate.

Markus Glaser studied Information Science, English and Psychology. He is currently working as a scientific assistant at the library of the University of Regensburg and has just begun working on his doctorate on Web-Based Collaborative Processes.

Richard Heigl studied History and German Philology. He completed his doctorate in Contemporary History. He is a freelance instructor for communication training and software applications, and works as a consultant on organizational development.

Bibliographic information

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Reviews

From the reviews:

"This current book moves on from introductory issues into more technical matters – thereby focusing on the creation of wikis using two of the most popular production engines – namely, MediaWiki and TWiki. … This is an interesting book which I would recommend to anyone who is interested in getting involved in the technical aspects of wiki creation. … the book is very well written – which makes reading it a pleasure rather than a chore." (Philip Barker, The Electronic Library, Vol. 25 (2), 2007)

"Wiki: Web Collaboration is one of the remarkably few books on the subject of wikis available … . It is written by three multidisciplinary authors from Germany, two with an information science background. … For someone contemplating installing and maintaining a MediaWiki-based wiki website, this is worthwhile material. … A short appendix gives additional information on installing TWiki, followed by a glossary, bibliography and brief index." (Jonathan Bowen, The Times Higher, July, 2006)

"Wikis are open-source, free software that facilities Web collaboration. … There are highlighted tips, notes, and cautions throughout the text that provide useful information on working with the software. I found them both helpful and conveniently located in the text … . The book is an excellent translation from the German edition." (Linda Kenny Sloan, Technical Communication, Vol. 54 (2), 2007)