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Behavior and Social Issues

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 13–19 | Cite as

Facilitating Objective-Setting in Behavior Therapy Through Social Mediation

  • H. A. Chris Ninness
  • Gina Richman
  • David Jaquess
  • Glenda Vittemberga
Article

Abstract

Three therapists were monitored as to their writing of short-term behavioral objectives on weekly progress notes following family therapy sessions. After a baseline period all therapists were given a verbal prompt to set weekly objectives with their clients and to document this procedure on weekly progress notes. The second intervention, using a multiple baseline across therapists, entailed implementing a prescription sheet whereby each therapist documented in writing objectives to be accomplished prior to the next session. Results suggest that the initial verbal prompt produced an improvement in the objective-setting behavior for two of the three therapists; however, use of the prescription sheet brought all three therapists to near 100% performance in objective-setting.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. A. Chris Ninness
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gina Richman
    • 1
  • David Jaquess
    • 1
  • Glenda Vittemberga
    • 1
  1. 1.Stephen F. Austin St. University, The Kennedy Institute and The Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineUSA
  2. 2.School Psychology & Behavior AnalysisNacogdochesUSA

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