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Fig. 4 | Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics

Fig. 4

From: Feature integration theory in non-humans: Spotlight on the archerfish

Fig. 4

Monkeys are used in a variety of visual-search experiments. (A) Saccade latency as a function of set size in monkeys. Triangle and square markers represent the average latencies of each monkey and solid circles represent the average latencies of the two monkeys. Feature-task results are represented by dashed lines and conjunction-task results are represented by solid lines. The average slopes make it clear that color feature and simple shape searches are more efficient than their conjunction counterparts. (B) Left panel: Three visual-search tasks conducted on monkeys. The target in all examples is the pink diamond. The tasks include (from top to bottom) a color feature task (blue box), a difficult shape task (green box), and a conjunction task (red box). Right panel: The mean reaction-time slope as a function of set size in the three search tasks for each monkey. The three search tasks are coded with the same colors as the stimulus presented in the left panel. (C) Two monkeys in this experiment were tested for a speed-accuracy tradeoff in visual search. They were trained to respond either as quickly or as accurately to a visual-search task containing shapes (experimental flow is demonstrated on the left panel). This experiment produced a classic speed-accuracy tradeoff result, with faster and more error-prone responses in the “time-condition” compared to the “accuracy-condition” (right panel). (D) The average latency of humans (left) and three monkeys (right). Both species responded faster to pictures of snakes (i.e., a threat) among pictures of flowers (i.e., a neutral distractor) than the other way around, despite having no experience with snakes. Image A is adapted from Bichot and Schall (1999), B from Wardak et al. (2012), and C from Heitz and Schall (2013). The left panel of image D is reproduced based on LoBue and DeLoache (2008) and the right panel of image D is adapted from Shibasaki and Kawai (2009)

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