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50 years of research sparked by Atkinson and Shiffrin (1968)

  • Kenneth J. MalmbergEmail author
  • Jeroen G. W. Raaijmakers
  • Richard M. Shiffrin
Article

Abstract

In this article we review the framework proposed in 1968 by Atkinson and Shiffrin. We discuss the prior context that led to its production, including the advent of cognitive and mathematical modeling, its principal concepts, the subsequent refinements and elaborations that followed, and the way that the framework influenced other researchers to test the ideas and, in some cases, propose alternatives. The article illustrates the large amount of research and the large number of memory models that were directly influenced by this chapter over the past 50 years.

Keywords

Memory models Recall Recognition Implicit memory Semantic memory 

Notes

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Copyright information

© The Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth J. Malmberg
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jeroen G. W. Raaijmakers
    • 2
  • Richard M. Shiffrin
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.PBSIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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