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Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute

, Volume 46, Issue 8, pp 267–271 | Cite as

AFM-MS for Protein Analysis of Plasma Samples of Patients with Ovarian Cancer

  • A. L. KayshevaEmail author
  • T. O. Pleshakova
  • K. A. Malsagova
  • K. Chingin
  • Rahman Matiur
  • A. N. Pronichev
  • V. G. Nikitaev
  • E. O. Ivanov
  • L. M. Vasilyak
  • V. S. Ziborov
  • N. D. Ivanova
  • A. A. Valueva
  • Yu. D. Ivanov
Article
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Abstract

An atomic force microscope (AFM) is a molecular detector that allows the recording of individual proteins and protein complexes on the surface of an atomically flat substrate, the AFM chip. Registration of target proteins is carried out after the fishing procedure — catching out of proteins from the volume of the analyzed solution to a surface of a small area (sensory zone of the chip) modified by affinity reagents against the target protein. The use of the procedure of biospecific enrichment makes it possible to effectively concentrate the molecules of the target proteins in an amount sufficient for the subsequent mass spectrometric analysis for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer in blood samples.

Keywords

atomic force microscopy targeted mass spectrometry protein detection prostate cancer 

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Notes

Acknowledgments

The work was performed in the framework of the Program for Basic Research of State Academies of Sciences for 2013–2020.

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Copyright information

© Allerton Press, Inc. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. L. Kaysheva
    • 1
    Email author
  • T. O. Pleshakova
    • 1
  • K. A. Malsagova
    • 1
  • K. Chingin
    • 2
  • Rahman Matiur
    • 2
  • A. N. Pronichev
    • 3
  • V. G. Nikitaev
    • 3
  • E. O. Ivanov
    • 3
  • L. M. Vasilyak
    • 4
  • V. S. Ziborov
    • 4
  • N. D. Ivanova
    • 5
  • A. A. Valueva
    • 1
  • Yu. D. Ivanov
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Biomedical ChemistryMoscowRussia
  2. 2.East China University of TechnologyNanchangChina
  3. 3.National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute)MoscowRussia
  4. 4.Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  5. 5.Moscow State Academy of Veterinary Medicine and BiotechnologyMoscowRussia

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