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Russian Journal of Non-Ferrous Metals

, Volume 59, Issue 6, pp 589–595 | Cite as

Study on Pure Mercurous Chloride Leaching with Sodium Thiosulfate

  • Chao HanEmail author
  • Wei Wang
  • Feng Xie
  • Guangxin Wang
  • Alex Volinsky
  • Moses Gekhtman
METALLURGY OF NONFERROUS METALS
  • 3 Downloads

Abstract

Mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2), also known as Calomel, is a typical mercury-containing mineral found in nature. In this work, the leaching behaviour of pure mercurous chloride dissolved in pure water and in thiosulfate solution was investigated. The mercurous chloride hardly dissolved in sulfuric acid solution at pH of 3 and pure water at pH of 6.4, with the corresponding maximum Hg extraction percentage at 3.1 and 7.5% respectively. However, the Hg extraction percentage increased to 45.8% in sodium hydroxide solution at pH of 11.2. The mercury extraction percentage reached a high of 62.6% in thiosulfate solution, and the leaching kinetics results show that the activation energy is 6.6 kJ/mol. This study indicates that the thiosulfate solution can efficiently extract mercury from mercurous chloride.

Keywords:

mercurous chloride leaching thiosulfate disproportionate reactions 

Notes

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The project was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (51374054) and the National Science Foundation (IRES 1358088).

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Copyright information

© Allerton Press, Inc. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chao Han
    • 1
    Email author
  • Wei Wang
    • 2
  • Feng Xie
    • 2
  • Guangxin Wang
    • 1
  • Alex Volinsky
    • 3
  • Moses Gekhtman
    • 4
  1. 1.Research Center for High Purity Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan University of Science and TechnologyLuoyangChina
  2. 2.School of Metallurgy, Northeastern UniversityShenyangChina
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South FloridaTampaUSA
  4. 4.College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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