Cytology and Genetics

, Volume 52, Issue 2, pp 95–102 | Cite as

SSR Marker Association with Variation of Stomatal Guard Cell Length in Bread Wheat

  • N. P. Lamari
  • M. V. Galaeva
  • V. I. Fait
  • O. O. Pogrebnyuk
Article
  • 7 Downloads

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to identify associations between allelic variants of microsatellite markers (SSRs) and genetic polymorphism with regard to “stomatal guard cell length” (SGCL) trait in a population of recombinant-inbred lines (RILs) of bread winter wheat. Cytological analysis of SGCL in leaf epidermis, polymerase chain reaction, and statistical calculations were performed in accordance with conventional procedures. Genetic diversity related to the SGCL trait was detected in an F7 Luzanivka odes’ka/Odes’ka chervonokolosa wheat RIL population. A significant effect of allelic differences in SSR loci in the four triple combinations of microsatellite loci on SGCL variation was demonstrated.

Keywords

bread winter SSR-loci stomata guard cell length 

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Copyright information

© Allerton Press, Inc. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. P. Lamari
    • 1
  • M. V. Galaeva
    • 1
  • V. I. Fait
    • 1
  • O. O. Pogrebnyuk
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Breeding and Genetics Institute–National Center of Seed and Cultivar InvestigationOdessaUkraine

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