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American Journal of Clinical Dermatology

, Volume 5, Issue 6, pp 453–458 | Cite as

Role of Imiquimod in Skin Cancer Treatment

  • Mirjana Urosevic
  • Reinhard Dummer
Review Article

Abstract

Cancer of the skin is by far the most common form of all cancers. Given the increasing incidence of skin cancer worldwide, it seems feasible to reconsider the treatment options available for dealing with this growing problem. Despite the lower costs associated with classical methods such as surgery and radiotherapy, immune response modifiers such as imiquimod appear to be good candidates for the future given their good cosmetic effects, the possibility of treating large areas, and the simpleness of patient-applied treatment with a cream formulation. This article reviews current literature on the use of imiquimod in the treatment of nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancer.

Keywords

Skin Cancer Basal Cell Carcinoma Imiquimod Actinic Keratosis Mycosis Fungoides 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

No sources of funding were used to assist in the preparation of this review. The authors have no conflicts of interest that are directly relevant to the content of this review.

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of DermatologyUniversity Hospital ZurichZurichSwitzerland

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