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Disease Management & Health Outcomes

, Volume 10, Issue 6, pp 337–343 | Cite as

Health Promotion for Individuals with Disabilities

The Need for a Transitional Model in Service Delivery
  • James H. Rimmer
Practical Disease Management

Abstract

Health promotion programs that are offered in the general community often present physical, attitudinal and knowledge barriers that limit participation by those with disabilities. These environmental barriers and the lack of information on how to overcome them make it difficult for individuals with disabilities to engage in health-promoting behaviors. This paper presents a brief overview of health promotion for individuals with disabilities in the areas of exercise, nutrition and health education, and describes a service delivery model that addresses the needs of this important subgroup. The primary emphasis of the model is to provide instructional guidance to those with disabilities in the supportive transitional setting that will assist them in overcoming environmental barriers to participation in their community (i.e. home or Wellness facility). The supportive transitional setting is used to empower people with disabilities to adopt healthier lifestyles and manage various secondary conditions related to their disability (e.g. fatigue, weakness, and pain). A sample program conducted in this setting is described.

Keywords

Physical Activity Spinal Cord Injury Down Syndrome Health Promotion Program Physical Activity Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported, in part, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Human Development and Disability, #R04CCR518810, U59CCU516732, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, RRTC on Aging with Developmental Disabilities, #H133B980046, and the National Institute on Aging, Midwest Roybal Center for Health Maintenance, PSO AG 15890.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Disability and Human DevelopmentCollege of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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