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BioDrugs

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 205–208 | Cite as

Human Papillomavirus Types 16 and 18 Vaccine (Recombinant, AS04 Adjuvanted, Adsorbed) [Cervarix™]

Profile Report
  • Susan J. Keam
  • Diane M. Harper
Adis Profile Report

Keywords

Cervical Cancer Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Invasive Cervical Cancer Cervarix Adjuvant System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wolters Kluwer Health ¦ AdisMairangi Bay, North Shore 0754, AucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.Women’s and Gender Studies ProgramDartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA
  3. 3.Wolters Kluwer HealthConshohockenUSA

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