Clinical Drug Investigation

, Volume 27, Issue 10, pp 727–729 | Cite as

First Use of Tamoxifen in an HIV Patient with Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis

Case Report

Abstract

Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a rare but serious life-threatening complication in peritoneal dialysis patients. At present, there is no evidence-based standard therapy for EPS. Tamoxifen has been used and shown good results in non-HIV peritoneal dialysis patients with EPS. We report a case of a patient with HIV treated with antiretroviral therapy (zidovudine, lamivudine and saquinavir) for several years. He had end-stage renal disease and was treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). After 11 years on CAPD, he developed EPS and was treated successfully with tamoxifen in combination with corticosteroids. No adverse effects were observed and no changes were noted in CD4 counts or HIV viral load during this therapy. These findings suggest that tamoxifen can be safely given to HIV patients with peritoneal dialysis-related EPS. Nevertheless, caution is required as tamoxifen could interact with certain antiretroviral agents.

Keywords

Tamoxifen Lamivudine Zidovudine Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Saquinavir 

Notes

Acknowledgements

No sources of funding were used to assist in the preparation of this report. The authors have no conflicts of interest that are directly relevant to the content of this report.

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine and Nephrology-Dialysis DivisionBrugmann University Hospital, CHU Brugmann (Free University of Brussels)BrusselsBelgium

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