Drugs & Therapy Perspectives

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 19–22 | Cite as

Cannabinoids courting attention because of their potential in CNS disorders

Disease Management
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Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Ondansetron Trigeminal Neuralgia Anandamide Rimonabant 

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