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American Journal of Cancer

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 193–198 | Cite as

Hormone Therapy Adjuvant to Radiotherapy in Non-Metastatic Prostate Cancer Settings

Impact on Biochemical Control
  • Ashesh B. Jani
  • John Gratzle
Original Research Article
  • 12 Downloads

Abstract

Background:Hormone therapy is commonly used with radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Aim:To provide a single-institution analysis of the benefits of hormone therapy with radiotherapy in different non-metastatic prostate cancer scenarios. Methods:The records of 527 patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advanced, localized, and post-prostatectomy disease were reviewed. For the 422 patients with localized disease, biochemical failure-free survival curves were generated for patients receiving or not receiving hormone therapy (with biochemical failure defined as three successive rises after prostate-specific antigen nadir). The survival curves were compared using the log-rank test and a multivariate analysis of all major patient, disease, and treatment factors was performed. Additionally, failure rates were compared using the chi-square test to determine the benefit of hormone therapy across each of the locally advanced, localized, and post-prostatectomy settings. Results:An advantage for the use of hormone therapy compared with radiotherapy alone was observed in the population with localized disease (3-year biochemical failure-free survival 78% vs 75%; p = 0.029). Of the patient, disease, and treatment factors analyzed, only clinical T-stage (p = 0.002), radiation dose (p = 0.006), and hormone therapy (p = 0.016) reached statistical significance on multivariate analysis. Furthermore, lower failure rates occured (with at least a trend observed [p < 0.10]) in patients receiving hormone therapy in each clinical scenario, with the exception of the localized low-risk subgroup. Conclusion:In a single-institution analysis, the addition of hormone therapy to radiotherapy was advantageous in all settings of non-metastatic prostate cancer except that of the very earliest disease presentation.

Keywords

Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy Goserelin Bicalutamide Biological Effective Dose 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

No sources of funding were used to assist in the preparation of this study. The authors have no conflicts of interest that are directly relevant to the content of this study

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ashesh B. Jani
    • 1
  • John Gratzle
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Radiation and Cellular OncologyUniversity of Chicago HospitalsChicagoUSA

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