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CNS Drugs

, Volume 20, Issue 9, pp 751–760 | Cite as

Rufinamide

Adis Drug Profile

Abstract

  • ▲ Rufinamide, a triazole derivative, reduces the recovery capacity of neuronal sodium channels after inactivation, limiting neuronal sodium-dependent action potential firing and mediating anticonvulsant effects.

  • ▲ In children, adolescents and adults, adjunctive oral rufinamide was more effective than placebo in treating seizures associated with treatment-resistant Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in a well designed 16-week trial. Rufinamide recipients experienced significantly greater reductions from baseline than placebo recipients in the median frequency of total seizures and tonic-atonic seizures per 28 days and demonstrated improvements in seizure severity.

  • ▲ Furthermore, these beneficial effects of rufinamide on seizure frequency were maintained throughout a subsequent 3-year, open-label extension study.

  • ▲ Relative to placebo, adjunctive rufinamide significantly reduced the frequency of partial seizures per 28 days in adult patients with inadequately controlled partial seizures in two well designed trials of ≈3 months duration, with a higher proportion of rufinamide recipients achieving a reduction of ≥50% in partial seizure frequency per 28 days.

  • ▲ Rufinamide was generally well tolerated in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and in those with partial seizures, with adverse events being mostly mild or moderate in severity.

Keywords

Valproate Placebo Recipient Vagus Nerve Stimulation Partial Seizure Seizure Frequency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Adis International LimitedMairangi Bay, AucklandNew Zealand

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