Sports Medicine

, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp 201–213 | Cite as

The Use of Laboratory Test Results with Long Distance Runners

  • Ben R. Londeree
Research Review

Summary

Appropriate tests can be used to accurately estimate: (a) an individual’s potential for success in long distance running; (b) his current level of conditioning; (c) his appropriate training and racing paces; and (d) his ideal bodyweight. The proposed tests include the study of V̇O2max, running efficiency, maximal steady-state, and body composition. Based on a review of the literature it was determined that V̇O2max, running efficiency, and body composition provide the information about long distance running potential, including specific paces for various events. Maximal steady-state running pace (pace that elicits 2 mmol/ L lactate) identifies appropriate running paces for various events. Relative maximal steady-state oxygen consumption (% V̇O2max) identifies the current level of conditioning. A comparison of maximal steady-state, running efficiency, and body composition by assessing current status with optimums, provide guidelines for appropriate changes.

Keywords

Blood Lactate Anaerobic Threshold Apply Physiology Distance Runner Blood Lactate Level 

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Copyright information

© ADIS Press Limited 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ben R. Londeree
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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