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Sports Medicine

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 1–7 | Cite as

Aspirin in Exercise-induced Hyperthermia Evidence For and Against Its Role

  • Stephen C. Johnson
  • Robert O. Ruhling
Leading Article

Keywords

Aspirin Body Core Temperature Skin Blood Flow Endogenous Pyrogen Heat Stress Index 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ADIS Press Limited 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen C. Johnson
    • 1
  • Robert O. Ruhling
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Performance Research Laboratory, Department of Physical Education, College of HealthThe University of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

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