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Drugs

, Volume 67, Issue 15, pp 2277–2288 | Cite as

Maraviroc

  • Natalie J. Carter
  • Gillian M. Keating
Adis Drug Profile

Abstract

  • ▲ Maraviroc is a specific, slowly reversible, noncompetitive, small-molecule antagonist of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which also serves as an HIV-1 coreceptor. By acting as an antagonist at the CCR5 coreceptor, maraviroc inhibits HIV-1 from entering host cells.

  • ▲ Clinical data for maraviroc are available from two large, well designed, ongoing phase IIb/III trials (MOTIVATE-1 and MOTIVATE-2) conducted in patients infected with R5-tropic HIV-1 who had previously received at least one agent from three of the four classes of antiretroviral drugs and/or were triple-class resistant.

  • ▲ According to 24-week interim results of the MOTIVATE-1 and -2 trials, a significantly greater reduction in viral load occurred in patients receiving maraviroc 150 or 300mg (depending on optimised background therapy [OBT]) twice daily plus OBT compared with placebo plus OBT. This significant difference was maintained at 48 weeks in MOTIVATE-1.

  • ▲ In the MOTIVATE-1 and -2 trials, a significantly greater proportion of patients receiving maraviroc plus OBT achieved an HIV-1 RNA level <400 and <50 copies/mL compared with those receiving placebo plus OBT. In addition, the CD4+ cell count was increased to a significantly greater extent with maraviroc plus OBT compared with placebo plus OBT.

  • ▲ The 48-week results of MOTIVATE-1 also report a significant difference in favour of maraviroc for all these endpoints.

  • ▲ In general, maraviroc at dosages of up to 300mg twice daily was well tolerated in treatment-experienced patients infected with R5-tropic HIV-1.

Keywords

Atazanavir Maraviroc Enfuvirtide CCR5 Antagonist Adis Drug Profile 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wolters Kluwer Health ∣ AdisMairangi Bay, North Shore 0754New Zealand
  2. 2.Wolters Kluwer HealthConshohockenUSA

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