Drugs

, Volume 54, Issue 2, pp 189–196 | Cite as

An Overview of the Status of Acellular Pertussis Vaccines in Practice

Leading Article

Summary

Infection with Bordetella pertussis continues to result in widespread morbidity and mortality. Although whole cell pertussis vaccines are effective in controlling pertussis, concerns relating to adverse effects following vaccination have led to the development of a new generation of pertussis vaccines. Acellular pertussis vaccines have decreased endotoxin content and are less reactogenic than whole cell vaccines. The composition of acellular pertussis vaccines varies, resulting in differing immunogenicity. Recent studies have demonstrated that these vaccines, in general, have an efficacy similar to that of whole cell vaccines. The development of acellular pertussis vaccines is an advance that should result in less discomfort from vaccination and the potential for increased vaccine usage, resulting in the possible elimination of this disease.

Keywords

Pertussis Pertussis Vaccine Cell Vaccine Bordetella Pertussis Acellular Pertussis Vaccine 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Cherry JD. The epidemiology of pertussis and pertussis immunization in the United Kingdom and the United States. Curr Probl Pediatr 1984; 14: 1–78PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Strebel P, Guris D, Tachdjian R, et al. Epidemiology of pertussis and the importance of laboratory diagnosis [abstract]. National Institutes of Health Pertussis Conference: acellular pertussis vaccine trials. Results and impact on US public health: 1996 Jun 3–5; Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Expanded Programme on Immunization. Global programme for vaccines and immunization: immunization policy. 1995: WHO Document WHO/EPI/GEN/95.3Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Farizo KM, Cochi SL, Zell ER, et al. Epidemiological features of pertussis in the United States, 1980–1989. Clin Infect Dis 1992; 14: 708–19PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Mink CM, Cherry JD, Christenson P, et al. A search for Bordetella pertussis infection in university students. Clin Infect Dis 1992; 14: 464–71PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Rosenthal S, Strebel P, Cassiday P, et al. Pertussis infection among adults during the 1993 outbreak in Chicago. J Infect Dis 1995; 171: 1650–2PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Wright SW, Edwards KM, Decker MD, et al. Pertussis infection in adults with persistent cough. JAMA 1995; 273: 1044–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Deen JL, Mink CM, Cherry JD, et al. Household contact study of Bordetella pertussis infections. Clin Infect Dis 1995; 21: 1211–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Mooi FR. Virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 1988; 54: 465–74PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Tuonamen E, Weiss A. Characterization of two adhesins of Bordetella pertussis for human ciliated respiratory epithelial cells. J Infect Dis 1985; 152: 118–25CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Mortimer Jr EA. Pertussis vaccine. In: Plotkin SA, Mortimer Jr EA, editors. Vaccines. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: Saunders, 1994: 91–135Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Tuomanen E, Weiss A, Rich R, et al. Filamentous hemagglutinin and pertussis toxin promote adherence of Bordetella pertussis to cilia. Dev Biol Stand 1985; 61: 197–204PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Winsnes R. Serological responses to pertussis. In: Wardlaw AC, Parton RD, editors. Pathogenesis and immunity in pertussis. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1988: 283–307Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Cody CF, Baraff LJ, Cherry JD, et al. Nature and rates of adverse reactions associated with DTP and DT immunization in infants and children. Pediatrics 1981; 68: 650–60PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Baraff LJ, Manclark CR, Cherry JD, et al. Analyses of adverse reactions to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine by vaccine lot, endotoxin content, pertussis vaccine potency and percentage of mouse weight gain. Pediatr Infect Dis J 1989; 8: 502–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Blumberg DA, Lewis K, Mink CM, et al. Severe reactions associated with diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine: detailed study of children with seizures, hypotonic-hyporesponsive episodes, high fevers, and persistent crying. Pediatrics 1993; 91: 1158–65PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    American Academy of Pediatrics. Pertussis. In: Peter G, editor. 1994 Red Book: Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. 23rd ed. Elk Grove Village (IL): American Academy of Pediatrics, 1994: 355–67Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Cherry JD. Acellular pertussis vaccines — a solution to the pertussis problem. J Infect Dis 1993; 168: 21–4PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Kimura M, Kuno-Saki H. Developments in pertussis immunisation in Japan. Lancet 1990; 2: 30–2CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Robinson A, Funnell SGP. Potency testing of acellular pertussis vaccines. Vaccine 1992; 10: 139–41PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Shahin RD, Mink C, Wiedermann BL, et al. Laboratory correlates of protection and protective immunity to Bordetella pertussis. In: Ciardi JE, Mcghee JR, Keith J, editors. Genetically engineered vaccines: prospects for oral disease prevention. New York (NY): Plenum Publishers, 1992: 287–92CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Edwards KM, Meade BD, Decker MD, et al. Comparison of 13 acellular pertussis vaccines: overview and serologic response. Pediatrics 1995; 96 Suppl.: 548–57PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Decker MD, Edwards KM, Steinhoff MC, et al. Comparison of 13 acellular pertussis vaccines: adverse reactions. Pediatrics 1995; 96 Suppl.: 557–66PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Ad Hoc Group for the Study of Pertussis Vaccines. Placebocontrolled trial of two acellular pertussis vaccines in Sweden — protective efficacy and adverse events [published erratum appears in Lancet 1988; 1: 1238]. Lancet 1988; 1: 955–60Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Edwards KM, Decker MD. Acellular pertussis vaccines for infants. N Engl J Med 1996; 334: 391–2PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Gustafsson L, Hollander HO, Olin P, et al. A controlled trial of a two-component acellular and a five-component acellular and a whole-cell pertussis vaccine. N Engl J Med 1996; 334: 349–55PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Greco D, Salmaso S, Mastrantonio P, et al. A controlled trial of two acellular vaccines and one whole cell vaccine against pertussis. N Engl J Med 1996; 334: 341–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Simondon F. Senegal pertussis trial [abstract]. National Institutes of Health Pertussis Conference: acellular pertussis vaccine trials. Results and impact on US public health: 1996 Jun 3–5; Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Plotkin S, Cadoz M. An interpretation of the acellular vaccine trials [abstract]. National Institutes of Health Pertussis Conference: acellular pertussis vaccine trials. Results and impact on US public health: 1996 Jun 3–5; Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Trollfors B, Taranger J, Lagergard T, et al. A placebo controlled trial of a pertussis-toxoid vaccine. N Engl J Med 1995; 333: 1045–50PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Heininger U. Erlangen pertussis trial [abstract]. National Institutes of Health Pertussis Conference: acellular pertussis vaccine trials. Results and impact on US public health: 1996 Jun 3–5; Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Liese JG, Harzer E, Meschievitz CK, et al. Efficacy of BIKEN acellular pertussis vaccine combined with diphtheria-tetanus toxoids (Tripedia) in infants [abstract]. National Institutes of Health Pertussis Conference: acellular pertussis vaccine trials. Results and impact on US public health: 1996 Jun 3–5; Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    Schmitt HJ, Zepp F, APV-050 Study Group. Immunogenicity, reactogenicity and protective efficacy of a three-component acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine in infants [abstract]. National Institutes of Health Pertussis Conference: acellular pertussis vaccine trials. Results and impact on US public health: 1996 Jun 3–5; Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Greco D, Salmaso S, Trial Working Group. The Italian trial on pertussis vaccine [abstract]. National Institutes of Health Pertussis Conference: acellular pertussis vaccine trials. Results and impact on US public health: 1996 Jun 3–5; Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    WHO Meeting on Case Definition of Pertussis: 1991 Jan 10–11; Geneva. Geneva: World Health Organization, 1991: 4–5 (issue no. MIN/EPI/PERT/91.1)Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Centers for Disease Control. Food and Drug Administration approval of a second acellular pertussis vaccine for use among infants and young children. MMWR 1997; 46: 110–1Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Centers for Disease Control. Food and Drug Administration approval of an acellular pertussis vaccine for the initial four doses of the diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccination series. MMWR 1996; 45: 676–7Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Cattaneo LA, Reed GW, Haase DH, et al. The seroepidemiology of Bordetella pertussis infections: a study of persons ages 1–65 years. J Infect Dis 1996; 173: 1256–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    Linneman CC, Ramundo N, Perlstein PH, et al. Use of pertussis vaccine in an epidemic involving hospital staff. Lancet 1975; 2: 540–3CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. 40.
    Edwards KM, Decker MD, Graham BS, et al. Adult immunization with acellular pertussis vaccine. JAMA 1993; 269: 53–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. 41.
    Greenberg DP, Wong VK, Partridge S, et al. Immunogenicity of a booster dose of Hib conjugate vaccine in children with impaired immune responses following primary vaccination with DTaP-Hep B-PRP-T vaccine [abstract no. G61]. Abstracts of the 36th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology, 1996: 154Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    Meschievitz CK. Acellular DTP development at Pasteur Merieux-Connaught [abstract]. National Institutes of Health Pertussis Conference: acellular pertussis vaccine trials. Results and impact on US public health: 1996 Jun 3–5; Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    Centers for Disease Control. FDA approval of a Haemophilus b conjugate vaccine combined by reconstitution with an acellular pertussis vaccine. MMWR 1996; 45: 993–5Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Greenberg DP, Wong VK, Partridge S, et al. Evaluation of a new combination vaccine that incorporates diphtheria-tetanusacellular pertussis (DTaP), hepatitis B (HB), and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate (PRP-T) vaccines [abstract no. G70]. Abstracts of the 35th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology, 1995: 170Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    Pichichero M, Passador S. Response to an Haemophilus influenzae B (HIB) Conjugate vaccine booster following low antibody responses to simultaneous DTaP-HIB-hepatitis B combination vaccine in infants [abstract no. 1076]. Presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting: 1996 May 6–10; Washington, DCGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Paediatric Infectious DiseasesUniversity of the Philippines, Philippine General HospitalManilaPhilippines
  2. 2.Department of Paediatric Infectious DiseasesU.C. Davis Medical CenterSacramentoUSA

Personalised recommendations