Drugs

, Volume 44, Supplement 1, pp 119–122 | Cite as

Arterial Calcinosis, Chronic Renal Failure and Calcium Antagonism

  • S. J. Marchais
  • A. P. Guerin
  • G. M. London
Article

Summary

A progressive rise in arterial calcium content is the most characteristic age-associated alteration in the arterial wall and the decisive factor in arteriosclerotic degeneration. Experimental studies have demonstrated that calcium antagonists can prevent or retard the development of arterial calcinosis associated with vitamin D overload, hypertension or alloxan-induced diabetes. Although similar effects are more difficult to observe in humans, they have been demonstrated in patients with coronary artery disease and in patients with end-stage renal disease, which is characterised by an acceleration of the normal arterial aging process.

Keywords

Calcium Antagonist Arterial Stiffness Pulse Wave Velocity Nitrendipine Calcinosis 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Blumenthal HT, Lansing AI, Wheeler PA. Calcification of the media of the human aorta and its relation to intimai arteriosclerosis, ageing, and disease. American Journal of Pathology 20: 665–671, 1944PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Fleckenstein A. Calcium antagonism: history and prospects for a multifaceted pharmacodynamic principle. In Opie LH (Ed.) Calcium antagonists and cardiovascular disease, pp. 9–28, Raven Press, New York, 1984Google Scholar
  3. Ibels SL, Alfrey AC, Huffer WE, Craswell PW, Anderson JT, et al. Arterial calcification and pathology in uremic patients undergoing dialysis. American Journal of Medicine 66: 790–796, 1979PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Lichtlen PR, Hugenholtz PG, Fafflenbeul W, Hecker H, Jost S, et al. Retardation of angiographic progression of coronary artery disease by nifedipine. Results of the Nifedipine International Trial on Antiatherosclerotic Therapy (INTACT). Lancet 335: 1109–1113, 1990PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. London GM, Marchais SJ, Guerin AP, Metivier F, Safar ME, et al. Salt and water retention and calcium blockade in uremia. Circulation 82: 105–113, 1990bPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. London GM, Marchais SJ, Safar ME, Genest AF, Guerin AP, et al. Aortic and large artery compliance in end-stage renal failure. Kidney International 37: 137–142, 1990aPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Marchais SJ, Boussac I, Guerin AP, Delavaux G, Metivier F, et al. Arteriosclerosis and antihypertensive response to calcium antagonists in end-stage renal failure. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology 18(Suppl. 1): S74–S78, 1991PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Meema HE, Oreopoulos DG, Rapoport A. Serum magnesium level and arterial calcification in end-stage renal disease. Kidney International 32: 388–394, 1987PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. O’Rourke MF. Arterial function in health and disease, pp. 53–132, pp. 185–195, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, 1982Google Scholar
  10. Pickering G. Arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis: the need for clear thinking. American Journal of Medicine 34: 7–18, 1963PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. Marchais
    • 1
  • A. P. Guerin
    • 1
  • G. M. London
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NephrologyManhes HospitalFleury-MérogisFrance

Personalised recommendations