Drugs

, Volume 37, Issue 6, pp 755–760 | Cite as

Do Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents Have a Role in the Treatment of Migraine Headaches?

  • Seymour Diamond
  • Frederick G. Freitag
Leading Article

Keywords

Migraine Naproxen Cluster Headache Naproxen Sodium Ergotamine 

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References

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Copyright information

© ADIS Press Limited 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seymour Diamond
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Frederick G. Freitag
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Diamond Headache Clinic Ltd and Inpatient Headache UnitLouis A. Weiss Memorial HospitalChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of PharmacologyChicago Medical SchoolChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Family MedicineChicago College of Osteopathic MedicineChicagoUSA
  4. 4.Department of MedicineUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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