Drugs

, Volume 35, Supplement 4, pp 39–43 | Cite as

Regression of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy during Combined Atenolol and Nifedipine Treatment

  • I.-W. Franz
  • U. Tönnesmann
  • U. Behr
  • R. Ketelhut
Section 1: Hypertension

Summary

36 patients with previously untreated essential hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy were treated with a fixed dose combination of atenolol 50mg and sustained release nifedipine 20mg once daily for a mean period of 12.1 months. Echocardiography showed a significant decrease after a mean period of 7.9 months in interventricular septal thickness (13.6%, p < 0.01), posterior wall thickness (12.6%, p < 0.001) and left ventricular mass index (18.3%). After 12.1 months the reductions were 20.7% (p < 0.001), 22.5% (p < 0.001) and 30.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. Posterior wall thickness was significantly reduced, but left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic dimensions and fractional shortening remained unchanged. Treatment significantly reduced resting blood pressure from 153/105mm Hg to 122/79mm Hg (p < 0.001), and exercise blood pressure at 100 W from 189/109 to 157/93mm Hg (p < 0.001). Thus, nifedipine in combination with atenolol produces significant blood pressure reduction accompanied by regression of left ventricular hypertrophy without noticeable changes in left ventricular function.

Keywords

Nifedipine Atenolol Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Ventricular Hypertrophy Left Ventricular Mass Index 

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Copyright information

© ADIS Press Limited 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • I.-W. Franz
    • 1
    • 2
  • U. Tönnesmann
    • 1
    • 2
  • U. Behr
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Ketelhut
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Cardiology, Klinikum CharlottenburgFree UniversityWest BerlinWest Germany
  2. 2.Klinik Wehrawald der BfATodtmoosGermany

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