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, Volume 35, Supplement 1, pp 9–14 | Cite as

Plasminogen Activators and Tiaprofenic Acid in Inflammation

A Preliminary Study
  • Gabriella Fibbi
  • Umberto Serni
  • Marco Pucci
  • Riccardo Caldini
  • Lucia Magnelli
  • Mario Del Rosso
Section 1: Experimental Findings

Summary

Treatment with tiaprofenic acid appreciably reduced the level of plasminogen activators in the medium of 3T3-Balb mouse flbroblasts, as revealed by both a fibrin plate assay and amidolytic determination with chromogenic substrates. At the same time, tiaprofenic acid was able to inhibit the production of plasminogen activators induced by phorbol myristate acetate, a powerful inflammation and tumour promoter, added to the cell monolayers. By isolating the inhibitors of plasminogen activators it was possible to show that the decrease of fibrinolytic activity produced by tiaprofenic acid is not related to an increase of inhibitors. Rather, a decrease of activators seems to take place.

Synovial fluid samples from 4 patients before and after treatment with tiaprofenic acid were also assayed for plasminogen activator activity by the fibrin lysis method. In 3 of the 4 cases a marked decrease after treatment was evident. The one unresponsive patient suffered from a para-neoplastic arthritis.

Keywords

Plasminogen Activator Synovial Fluid Fibrinolytic Activity Tiaprofenic Acid Synovial Fluid Sample 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ADIS Press Limited 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabriella Fibbi
    • 1
  • Umberto Serni
    • 2
  • Marco Pucci
    • 3
  • Riccardo Caldini
    • 3
  • Lucia Magnelli
    • 3
  • Mario Del Rosso
    • 3
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Farmacologia Preclinica e Clinica ‘Mario Aiazzi Mancini’Universitá di FirenzeFirenzeItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Reumatologia dell’Istitüto Ortopedico ToscanoFirenzeItaly
  3. 3.Istituto di Patologia Generale dell’Università di FirenzeFirenzeItaly

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