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Drugs

, Volume 31, Supplement 3, pp 109–112 | Cite as

Bronchopulmonary Infection due to B. catarrhalis

Clinical Features and Therapeutic Response
  • Dwight T. McLeod
  • Fareed Ahmad
  • Michael J. Croughan
  • Margaret A. Calder
Section 3: Therapeutic Aspects: Part 1

Summary

A study was made of the clinical features and therapeutic response of 144 patients from whose sputum Branhamella catarrhalis was isolated. Typically, features of bronchopulmonary infection with cough productive of moderate amounts of purulent sputum, fever and dyspnoea were present. Of 74 patients who were infected in the community, 50 required hospital admission. Nosocomial infection occurred in the remaining 70 patients. Most patients had chronic pulmonary diseases or carcinoma bronchus; pneumonia occurred in 12 patients. Acute tracheobronchitis developed in 4 healthy non- smokers after viral illnesses. B. catarrhalis contributed to the death of 8 patients. Overall, 59% of isolates produced β-lactamase but the proportion had risen to 70% by the end of the study; half of these were community acquired. 41% of patients who were treated initially with ampicillin did not respond. Clavulanic acid plus amoxycillin co-trimoxazole,erythromycin, tetracycline, cefuroxime and cefotaxime are useful alternative antibiotics. All strains of B. catarrhalis were resistant to trimethoprim.

Keywords

Cefuroxime Clavulanic Acid Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Amoxycillin Chronic Pulmonary Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ADIS Press Limited 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dwight T. McLeod
    • 1
  • Fareed Ahmad
    • 1
  • Michael J. Croughan
    • 1
  • Margaret A. Calder
    • 1
  1. 1.Chest Unit and Department of BacteriologyCity HospitalEdinburghGermany

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