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Drugs

, Volume 25, Supplement 2, pp 177–180 | Cite as

The Influence of Cigarette Smoking on the Medical Management of Angina

  • K. M. Fox
  • J. Deanfield
  • S. Krikler
  • P. Ribeiro
  • C. Wright
Section 3: Angina and Arrhythmias
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Summary

Smoking is known to increase heart rate directly and previous work has shown smoking to aggravate the electrocardiographic evidence of myocardial ischaemia. The present study was designed to determine whether smoking interferes with the medical management of angina.

Smoking caused direct and adverse effects on the heart which were still evident after treatment with nifedipine, propranolol and atenolol. The interaction between smoking and antianginal drugs was most evident with nifedipine and least obvious with atenolol. Blood levels suggest that part of this differential effect may be related to the known different metabolic pathways of the drugs.

Keywords

Propranolol Nifedipine Myocardial Ischaemia Atenolol Maximal Exercise Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© ADIS Press Australasia Pty Ltd (Inc. NSW) 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. M. Fox
    • 1
  • J. Deanfield
    • 1
  • S. Krikler
    • 1
  • P. Ribeiro
    • 1
  • C. Wright
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of CardiologyHammersmith HospitalLondonEngland

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