Clinical Pharmacokinetics

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 183–186 | Cite as

Plasma Protein Binding of Lidocaine and Warfarin in Insulin-Dependent and Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

  • Sharon O’Byrne
  • Michael G. Barry
  • William C. J. Collins
  • Patricia O’Connor
  • Michael J. Cullen
  • John Feely
Original Research Article

Summary

We examined the plasma protein binding of an acidic drug (warfarin bound to albumin) and a basic drug [lidocaine (lignocaine) bound to α1-acid glycoprotein] in 15 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and 15 matched controls. We also examined protein binding of warfarin and lidocaine in 30 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) and 25 controls. Compared with control, the binding of both warfarin (98.81 ± 0.02 vs 98.57 ± 0.03%, mean ± SEM) and of lidocaine (69 ± 2 vs 58 ± 2%) was significantly reduced in IDDM. This group had lower concentrations of both albumin and α1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), achieving statistical significance vs control for albumin only. In the patients with NIDDM, who had a similar level of glycosylated haemoglobin, while there was no significant difference in the binding of lidocaine there was a significant increase in warfarin binding compared with the control population (99.01 ± 0.03 vs 98.82 ± 0.04%). This study suggests that binding of both acidic and basic drugs is altered in both IDDM and NIDDM.

Keywords

Warfarin Lidocaine Plasma Protein Binding Drug Binding Basic Drug 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon O’Byrne
    • 1
  • Michael G. Barry
    • 1
  • William C. J. Collins
    • 1
  • Patricia O’Connor
    • 1
  • Michael J. Cullen
    • 1
  • John Feely
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Pharmacology and Therapeutics and EndocrinologyTrinity College Medical School, St James’s HospitalDublinIreland

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