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Clinical Pharmacokinetics

, Volume 18, Issue 6, pp 423–433 | Cite as

Stable Isotopes in Clinical Pharmacokinetic Investigations

Advantages and Disadvantages
  • Thomas R. Browne
Leading Article

Keywords

Stable Isotope Parent Drug Isotope Effect Drug Interaction Study Tracer Dose 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Adis Press Limited 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas R. Browne
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Neurology and PharmacologyBoston University School of Medicine and Boston Veterans Administration Medical CenterBostonUSA

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