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Clinical Pharmacokinetics

, Volume 16, Supplement 1, pp 1–4 | Cite as

Unique Aspects of Quinolone Pharmacokinetics

  • H. Lode
  • G. Höffken
  • K. Borner
  • P. Koeppe
Article

Summary

Despite some limited differences in pharmacokinetic parameters among the newer quinolones, their pharmacology is characterised by high volumes of distribution, long elimination half-lives, good to excellent bioavailability, low protein binding, limited biotransformation and different elimination pathways (mainly through the kidneys). The unique aspects of quinolones in comparison with β-lactams and aminoglycosides are their higher volumes of distribution, longer elimination half-lives and their intracellular high concentration, especially in phagocytic cells.

Keywords

Ofloxacin Quinolones Norfloxacin Pefloxacin Unique Aspect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ADIS Press Limited 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Lode
    • 1
  • G. Höffken
    • 1
  • K. Borner
    • 1
  • P. Koeppe
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Department of Klinikum SteglitzFreie UniversitätBerlin 45Federal Republic of Germany

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