Drugs & Aging

, Volume 2, Issue 3, pp 174–195 | Cite as

Sex Steroids and Cancer in Older Women

  • T. R. Varma
Review Article Drug Therapy
  • 6 Downloads

Summary

Menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) continue to be controversial subjects.

The main concern is the potential risk of prolonged HRT and the possible development of endometrial and breast carcinoma. There is no obvious evidence at present to suggest that HRT increases endometrial carcinoma provided the patient receives progestogen for a period of 10 or more days (usual period is 12 days) during each month. However the breast does not seem to enjoy this safety margin and there is some concern about possible increase in the incidence of breast cancer if the treatment period is longer than 5 years. The increase in the risk is higher after 15 years of estrogen use. There is no obvious adverse effect on the ovary or on the cervix following HRT.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Estrogen Postmenopausal Woman Breast Cancer Risk Endometrial Cancer 

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© Adis International Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. R. Varma
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynaecologySt George’s Hospital Medical School, Cranmer TerraceLondonEngland

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