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Drug Safety

, Volume 31, Issue 10, pp 885–885 | Cite as

A Tool for Preventing Medication Errors Due to Similar Labeling and Packaging of Drugs in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital

  • M. C. Sakai
  • P. LuppiJr
  • P. S. K. Takahashi
  • A. B. Sousa
  • E. Ribeiro
Abstract

Keywords

Medication Error False Recognition Neuromuscular Blockage Drug Similar Label Label Format 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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    Cohen M. Medication Errors: Causes, Prevention, and Risk Management. Sudbury, MA: John and Bartlett, 1999Google Scholar
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    Watanabe R, Gilbreath K, Sakamoto C. The ability of the geriatric population to read labels on over-the-counter medication containers. Journal of the American Optometric Association 1994; 65: 32–7PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Wogalter MS, Vigilante WJ Jr. Effects of label format on knowledge acquisition and perceived readability by younger and older adults. Ergonomics 2003; 46: 327–44PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Lambert B, Chang K, Lin S. Effect of orthographic and phonological similarity on false recognition of drug names. Social Science and Medicine 2001; 52: 1843–57PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Filik R, Purdy K, Gale A, et al. Drug name confusion: evaluating the effectiveness of capital (“Tall Man”) letters using eye movement data. Social Science and Medicine 2004; 59: 2597–601PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. C. Sakai
    • 1
  • P. LuppiJr
    • 1
  • P. S. K. Takahashi
    • 1
  • A. B. Sousa
    • 1
  • E. Ribeiro
    • 1
  1. 1.University Hospital of the University of São PauloBrazil

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