Drug Safety

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 207–218 | Cite as

Lipid Formulations of Amphotericin B

Less Toxicity But at What Economic Cost?
  • Jan Tollemar
  • Olle Ringdén
Leading Article

Keywords

Amphotericin Transplant Recipient Bone Marrow Transplant Aspergillosis Visceral Leishmaniasis 

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Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan Tollemar
    • 1
  • Olle Ringdén
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Transplantation Surgery and Clinical ImmunologyHuddinge Hospital, Karolinska InstitutetStockholm, HuddingeSweden

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