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Molecular Medicine

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 816–816 | Cite as

Erratum to: Widespread Expression of Erythropoietin Receptor in Brain and Its Induction by Injury

  • Christoph Ott
  • Henrik Martens
  • Imam Hassouna
  • Barbara Oliveira
  • Christian Erck
  • Maria-Patapia Zafeiriou
  • Ulla-Kaisa Peteri
  • Dörte Hesse
  • Simone Gerhart
  • Bekir Altas
  • Tekla Kolbow
  • Herbert Stadler
  • Hiroshi Kawabe
  • Wolfram-Hubertus Zimmermann
  • Klaus-Armin Nave
  • Walter Schulz-Schaeffer
  • Olaf Jahn
  • Hannelore Ehrenreich
Erratum
  • 26 Downloads

The following paragraph was published in: Christoph Ott, Henrik Martens, Imam Hassouna, Bárbara Oliveira, Christian Erck, Maria-Patapia Zafeiriou, Ulla-Kaisa Peteri, Dörte Hesse, Simone Gerhart, Bekir Altas, Tekla Kolbow, Herbert Stadler, Hiroshi Kawabe, Wolfram-Hubertus Zimmermann, Klaus-Armin Nave, Walter Schulz-Schaeffer, Olaf Jahn, and Hannelore Ehrenreich. Widespread Expression of Erythropoietin Receptor in Brain and Its Induction by Injury. Mol. Med. 21:803-15.

Antibodies against EPOR (EPOR-AB) have been widely used to characterize EPOR expression and localization, but cell surface EPOR expression is low, even in stimulated states, and, most importantly, all commercially available EPOR-AB have been hampered by nonspecific cross-reactivities, calling into question the literature based exclusively on them. This, in turn, raised discussions within the scientific community, questioning the expression of EPOR in extra-hematopoietic tissues (14–16). These discussions were likely nurtured by conflicts of interest, trying to restrict the effects of EPO, a highly attractive compound commercially for the anemia market, to hematopoiesis. Nevertheless, they made it very obvious that the existing EPOR-AB were essentially unreliable, and that the production and thorough characterization of new and more specific EPOR-AB had to be seen as a major challenge for the future (14,17–18).

Molecular Medicine encourages scientific discourse, but does not impute motive in disagreements. The editors apologize for this oversight.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Christoph Ott
    • 1
  • Henrik Martens
    • 2
  • Imam Hassouna
    • 1
    • 3
  • Barbara Oliveira
    • 1
  • Christian Erck
    • 2
  • Maria-Patapia Zafeiriou
    • 4
  • Ulla-Kaisa Peteri
    • 1
  • Dörte Hesse
    • 5
  • Simone Gerhart
    • 1
  • Bekir Altas
    • 6
  • Tekla Kolbow
    • 2
  • Herbert Stadler
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Kawabe
    • 6
  • Wolfram-Hubertus Zimmermann
    • 4
  • Klaus-Armin Nave
    • 7
    • 8
  • Walter Schulz-Schaeffer
    • 9
  • Olaf Jahn
    • 5
    • 8
  • Hannelore Ehrenreich
    • 1
    • 8
  1. 1.Clinical NeuroscienceMax Planck Institute of Experimental MedicineGöttingenGermany
  2. 2.Synaptic Systems GmbHGöttingenGermany
  3. 3.Physiology Unit, Zoology Department, Faculty of ScienceMenoufia UniversityMenoufiaEgypt
  4. 4.Institute of PharmacologyUniversity Medicine GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  5. 5.Proteomics GroupMax Planck Institute of Experimental MedicineGöttingenGermany
  6. 6.Molecular NeurobiologyMax Planck Institute of Experimental MedicineGöttingenGermany
  7. 7.NeurogeneticsMax Planck Institute of Experimental MedicineGöttingenGermany
  8. 8.DFG Center for Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain (CNMPB)GöttingenGermany
  9. 9.Department of NeuropathologyUniversity Medicine GöttingenGöttingenGermany

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