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Molecular Medicine

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 381–388 | Cite as

Piwi-Interacting RNAs (piRNAs) Are Dysregulated in Renal Cell Carcinoma and Associated with Tumor Metastasis and Cancer-Specific Survival

  • Yuping Li
  • Xiwei Wu
  • Hanlin Gao
  • Jennifer M. Jin
  • Arthur X. Li
  • Young S. Kim
  • Sumanta K. Pal
  • Rebecca A. Nelson
  • Clayton M. Lau
  • Chao Guo
  • Bing Mu
  • Jinhui Wang
  • Frances Wang
  • Jessica Wang
  • Yuanyin Zhao
  • Wengang Chen
  • John J. Rossi
  • Lawrence M. Weiss
  • Huiqing Wu
Research Article

Abstract

Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are a distinct group of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) that silence transposable genetic elements to protect genome integrity. Because of their limited expression in gonads and sequence diversity, piRNAs remain the most mysterious class of small RNAs. Studies have shown piRNAs are present in somatic cells and dysregulated in gastric, breast and liver cancers. By deep sequencing 24 frozen benign kidney and clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) specimens and using the publically available piRNA database, we found 26,991 piRNAs present in human kidney tissue. Among 920 piRNAs that had at least two copies in one specimen, 19 were differentially expressed in benign kidney and ccRCC tissues, and 46 were associated with metastasis. Among the metastasis-related piRNAs, we found three piRNAs (piR-32051, piR-39894 and piR-43607) to be derived from the same piRNA cluster at chromosome 17. We confirmed the three selected piRNAs not to be miRNAs or miRNA-like sncRNAs. We further validated the aberrant expression of the three piRNAs in a 68-case formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) ccRCC tissue cohort and showed the upregulation of the three piRNAs to be highly associated with ccRCC metastasis, late clinical stage and poor cancer-specific survival.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was funded by the Beckman Research Institute of COH and California Cancer Specialists Medical Group. This work was also partly funded by the 2013 COHNMC Department Chairs Discretionary Funds and National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant 81072155). The authors thank Joo Song and Massimo D’Apuzzo at the COHNMC Department of Pathology for their help.

Supplementary material

10020_2015_2101381_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (252 kb)
Supplementary material, approximately 251 KB.

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© The Author(s) 2015

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuping Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiwei Wu
    • 3
  • Hanlin Gao
    • 1
  • Jennifer M. Jin
    • 1
  • Arthur X. Li
    • 4
  • Young S. Kim
    • 1
  • Sumanta K. Pal
    • 5
  • Rebecca A. Nelson
    • 4
  • Clayton M. Lau
    • 6
  • Chao Guo
    • 1
  • Bing Mu
    • 3
  • Jinhui Wang
    • 3
  • Frances Wang
    • 1
  • Jessica Wang
    • 1
  • Yuanyin Zhao
    • 2
  • Wengang Chen
    • 1
  • John J. Rossi
    • 3
  • Lawrence M. Weiss
    • 1
  • Huiqing Wu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyCity of Hope National Medical Center and Beckman Research InstituteDuarteUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyThird Military Medical UniversityChongqingChina
  3. 3.Department of Molecular and Cellular BiologyCity of Hope National Medical Center and Beckman Research InstituteDuarteUSA
  4. 4.Department of Information SciencesCity of Hope National Medical Center and Beckman Research InstituteDuarteUSA
  5. 5.Department of Medical Oncology and Therapeutics ResearchCity of Hope National Medical Center and Beckman Research InstituteDuarteUSA
  6. 6.Department of Surgical OncologyCity of Hope National Medical Center and Beckman Research InstituteDuarteUSA

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