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Molecular Medicine

, Volume 14, Issue 7–8, pp 436–442 | Cite as

Soluble FcγRIIIa Levels in Plasma Correlate with Carotid Maximum Intima-Media Thickness (IMT) in Subjects Undergoing an Annual Medical Checkup

  • Midori Masuda
  • Katsuya Amano
  • Shi Yan Hong
  • Noriko Nishimura
  • Masayoshi Fukui
  • Masamichi Yoshika
  • Yutaka Komiyama
  • Hiroya Masaki
  • Toshiji Iwasaka
  • Hakuo Takahashi
Research Article

Abstract

Macrophages play a major role in the development of vascular lesions in atherogenesis. The cells express FcγRIIIa (CD16) identical to that in NK cells, but with a cell type-specific glycosylation, and these soluble forms (sFcγRIIIa) are present in plasma. We measured sFcγRIIIa derived from macrophages in plasma from subjects undergoing an annual medical checkup. The levels of sFcγRIIIa increased with age, and correlated positively with body mass index, blood pressure, LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio, triglycerides, hemoglobin A1c, and creatinine, but negatively with HDL-cholesterol levels. The sFcγRIIIa levels were related to the number of risk factors for atherosclerosis: such as aging, current smoking, diabetes, hypertension, hyper-LDL-cholesterolemia, hypo-HDL-cholesterolemia, and family history of atherosclerotic diseases. In addition, the sFcγRIIIa levels were correlated with carotid maximum intima-media thickness (IMT). These findings indicate the macrophages are activated during the incipient stage of atherosclerosis, and suggest sFcγRIIIa may be used as a predictive marker for atherosclerosis.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Masja de Haas and Federico Garrido for their generous gifts of antibody. This work was supported in part by grants from the Ministry of Education, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) (14572192, 17590503, and 19590575) (M Masuda) and from Setsuro Fujii Memorial The Osaka Foundation for Promotion of Fundamental Medical Research (S Y Hong).

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Copyright information

© Feinstein Institute for Medical Research 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Midori Masuda
    • 1
  • Katsuya Amano
    • 2
  • Shi Yan Hong
    • 1
  • Noriko Nishimura
    • 1
  • Masayoshi Fukui
    • 2
  • Masamichi Yoshika
    • 1
  • Yutaka Komiyama
    • 1
  • Hiroya Masaki
    • 1
  • Toshiji Iwasaka
    • 2
  • Hakuo Takahashi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Sciences and Laboratory MedicineKansai Medical UniversityMoriguchi, OsakaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Medicine IIKansai Medical UniversityOsakaJapan

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