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Epileptic Disorders

, 13:99 | Cite as

Tonic status and electrodecremental paroxysms in an adult without epilepsy

Clinical Commentary
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Abstract

Electrodecremental status epilepticus is classically described in infants and children with severe refractory epilepsy, mental retardation, and structural brain abnormalities. We describe a 24-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with prolonged tonic status epilepticus which evolved into stimulus-induced diffuse voltage attenuation (SIDVA) pattern in the setting of aseptic meningoencephalitis. There was no history of seizures or further events after recovery. This is the first report of a SIDVA pattern in an adult without a history of epilepsy.

Key words

tonic status electrodecremental meningoencephalitis adult stimulus-induced 

References

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Copyright information

© John Libbey Eurotext and Springer 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of NeurologyJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyJohns Hopkins School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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