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European Journal of Dermatology

, Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 53–62 | Cite as

Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with higher carotid intima-media thickness in psoriatic patients

  • Jacinto Orgaz-Molina
  • Cesar Magro-Checa
  • José Luis Rosales-Alexander
  • Miguel A. Arrabal-Polo
  • Luisa Castellote-Caballero
  • Agustin Buendía-Eisman
  • Enriqué Raya-Álvarez
  • Salvador Arias-Santiago
Investigative Report

Abstract

Background

Psoriasis has been associated with vitamin D insufficiency and cardiovascular risk factors. Reports show that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) levels are inversely associated with chronic inflammatory systemic diseases, cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular outcomes.

Objective

To analyze the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis (maximal intima-media thickness (MIMT)) in psoriasis patients and controls. MIMT was compared and associated factors were analyzed.

Patients and Method

This was a case-control study with 44 psoriatic patients without arthritis from a Dermatology outpatient clinic in Granada (Spain) and 44 controls. Confounding factors related to 25-OHD serum levels and cardiovascular risk factors were also analyzed.

Results

25-OHD levels were significantly lower in the psoriatic than in the control group (29.20 vs. 38.00 ng/mL p<0.0001) and a significant negative correlation was found between serum 25-OHD levels and the MIMT (rs = −0.678, p<0.0001) in psoriatic patients. No correlation was found in healthy controls. This association remained after adjusting for confounders. Serum 25-OHD levels were significantly lower (p = 0.003) in psoriatic patients with carotid atheromatous plaque (22.38 ± 10.23 ng/mL) than in those without (31.74 ± 8.62 ng/mL). Patients with a longer history of psoriasis presented significantly higher MIMT than controls (638.70 ± 76.21 vs 594.67 ± 80.20 μm; p = 0.026 for ≥6 yrs with psoriasis).

Conclusions

In psoriasis patients, lower serum 25-OHD levels were associated with higher MIMT after adjusting for selected confounding factors. The MIMT risk increases with a longer history of psoriasis, regardless of the patient’s age.

Keywords

vitamin D 25-hydroxyvitamin D carotid artery atherosclerosis cardiovascular risk factors psoriasis 

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Copyright information

© John Libbey Eurotext 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacinto Orgaz-Molina
    • 1
  • Cesar Magro-Checa
    • 2
  • José Luis Rosales-Alexander
    • 2
  • Miguel A. Arrabal-Polo
    • 3
  • Luisa Castellote-Caballero
    • 4
  • Agustin Buendía-Eisman
    • 3
  • Enriqué Raya-Álvarez
    • 2
  • Salvador Arias-Santiago
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Dermatology DepartmentUniversity Hospital of San CecilioGranadaSpain
  2. 2.Rheumatology DepartmentUniversity Hospital of San CecilioGranadaSpain
  3. 3.School of MedicineUniversity Hospital of San CecilioGranadaSpain
  4. 4.Radiology DepartmentUniversity Hospital of San CecilioGranadaSpain

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