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European Journal of Dermatology

, Volume 28, Issue 3, pp 314–319 | Cite as

Decreased IL-10-producing regulatory B cells in patients with advanced mycosis fungoides

  • Taro Akatsuka
  • Tomomitsu Miyagaki
  • Rina Nakajima
  • Hiroaki Kamijo
  • Tomonori Oka
  • Naomi Takahashi
  • Hiraku Suga
  • Ayumi Yoshizaki
  • Yoshihide Asano
  • Makoto Sugaya
  • Shinichi Sato
Investigative Report

Abstract

Background

Historically, B cells have been considered as positive regulators of humoral immune responses. Specific B-cell subsets, however, negatively regulate immune responses and are termed “regulatory B cells” (Bregs). Recently, Bregs have been linked to not only inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, but also malignancies via suppressing antitumour immunity.

Objectives

To investigate the involvement of Bregs in advanced mycosis fungoides (MF).

Materials&Methods

The frequency ofCD19+CD24hiCD27+ memoryBcells andCD19+CD24hiCD38hi transitional B cells (which enrich IL-10-producing Bregs) was examined in peripheral blood from patients with advanced MF (n = 11) and healthy controls (n = 9) by flow cytometry. The frequency of IL-10-producing Bregs was also measured by flow cytometry. The correlation between frequency or number of B-cell subsets and disease severity markers was also analysed.

Results

The frequency of CD19+CD24hiCD27+ B cells, CD19+CD24hiCD38hi B cells, and IL-10-producing B cells was decreased in peripheral blood of advanced MF patients. The frequency and number of these B-cell subsets inversely correlated with serum soluble IL-2 receptor and serum lactate dehydrogenase levels.

Conclusions

The development of IL-10-producing Bregs is impaired in patients with advanced MF and a decrease in IL-10-producing Bregs may play an important role in the progression of advanced MF.

Key words

B cells regulatory B cells (Bregs) mycosis fungoides IL- 10 

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Copyright information

© John Libbey Eurotext 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Taro Akatsuka
    • 1
  • Tomomitsu Miyagaki
    • 1
  • Rina Nakajima
    • 1
  • Hiroaki Kamijo
    • 1
  • Tomonori Oka
    • 1
  • Naomi Takahashi
    • 1
  • Hiraku Suga
    • 1
  • Ayumi Yoshizaki
    • 1
  • Yoshihide Asano
    • 1
  • Makoto Sugaya
    • 1
  • Shinichi Sato
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Dermatologythe University of Tokyo Graduate School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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