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Economic Botany

, Volume 59, Issue 4, pp 386–390 | Cite as

The role of barley among the shuhi in the Tibetan Cultural Area of the Eastern Himalayas.

  • Caroline S. Weckerle
  • Franz K. Huber
  • Yang Yongping
  • Sun Weibang
Notes On Economic Plants

Keywords

Economic Botany Barley Variety Barley Grain Kunming Institute Naxi 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden Press 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Caroline S. Weckerle
    • 1
  • Franz K. Huber
    • 2
  • Yang Yongping
    • 2
  • Sun Weibang
    • 2
  1. 1.Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Institute of Systematic BotanyUniversity of Zurich, Kunming Institute of BotanyKunmingChina
  2. 2.Kunming Institute of BotanyChinese Academy of SciencesKunmingChina

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