Advertisement

Economic Botany

, Volume 58, Supplement 1, pp S280–S293 | Cite as

The inclusion of recently introduced plants in the Hawaiian ethnopharmacopoeia

  • Palmer Christian T. 
Special Section on Medicinal Plants

Abstract

Economic Botany 58(Supplement):S280–S293, 2004. This study examines the adaptation and evolution of the Hawaiian ethnopharmacopoeia looking specifically at the inclusion of recently introduced plants in the pharmacopoeia as recorded within ethnobotanical studies from 1838–2002. Generally, the number of native plants (both indigenous and endemic) recorded in ethnobotanical studies decreases over time, while the number of recently introduced plant increases. This study lists the recently introduced plants, the date they were first recorded as part of the ethnophar-macopoeia, and their place of origin. It also discusses some of the possible factors influencing the inclusion of new plants in the Hawaiian medical tradition, building on and adding to the current work on the origin of Polynesian herbal medicine.

Key Words

Ethnopharmacopoeia Hawaii new medicinal plants Polynesia herbal medicine 

Literature Cited

  1. Abbott, A. I. 1984. Limu: An ethnobotanical study of some Hawaiian seaweeds. Pacific Tropical Botanical Garden, Lawai.Google Scholar
  2. — 1999. Marine red algae of the Hawaiian Islands. Bishop Museum Press, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  3. —, and C. Shimazu. 1985. The geographic origin of the plants most commonly used for medicine by Hawaiians. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 14:213–222.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Barrau, J. 1963. Plants and migrations of Pacific peo ples: A symposium. Bishop Museum Press, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  5. Bennett, B. C., and G. T. Prance. 2000. Introduced plants in indigenous pharmacopoeias. Economic Botany 54(1):90–102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Chun, M. N. 1986. Hawaiian medicine book: He buke la’au lapa’au. Translated. Bess Press, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  7. Cox, P. A. 1991. Polynesian herbal medicine. Pages 147–168 in P. A. Cox and S. A. Banack, eds., Islands, plants, and Polynesians: An introduction to Polynesian ethnobotany. Dioscorides Press, Portland.Google Scholar
  8. Davis, W. 1995. Ethnobotany: An old practice, a new discipline. Pages 40–51 in R. E. Schultz and Siri von Reis, eds., Evolution of a discipline. Dioscorides Press, Portland.Google Scholar
  9. George, L. O. 1989. An ethnomedical study of tradi tional medicine in Tonga. M.S. dissertation, Dept. of Botany and Range Science, Brigham Young University-Provo.Google Scholar
  10. Gutmanis, J. 1976. Kahuna la’au lapa’au: The practice of Hawaiian herbal medicine. Island Heritage Press, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  11. Handy, E. S. C, M. K. Pukui, and K. Livermore. 1934. Outline of Hawaiian physical therapeutics. Bishop Museum Bulletin 126. Krauss Reprints, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  12. Harris, D. R. 1998. Introduction: The multi-disciplinary study of cross-cultural plant exchange. Pages 85–91 in H. D. V. Prendergast, N. L. Etkin, P. R. Harris, and P. J. Houghton, eds., Plants for food and medicine. Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew.Google Scholar
  13. Johns, T. 1990. The origin of human diet and medicine: Chemical ecology. University of Arizona Press, Tucson.Google Scholar
  14. Judd, N. L. K. M. 1997. Laau lapaau: A geography of Hawaiian herbal healing. Thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (University of Hawaii at Manoa). Geography; no. 3483.Google Scholar
  15. Juvik, S. P., and J. O. Juvik. 1998. Atlas of Hawaii. 3rd ed. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  16. Kamakau, S. M. 1964. Ka po’e kahiko, the people of old. Translated M. K. Pukui. Bishop Museum Press. Special Publication 51, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  17. Krauss, B. H. 1979. Native plants used as medicine in Hawaii. Lyon Arboretum, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  18. — 1993. Plants in Hawaiian culture. University of Hawaii Press. Honolulu.Google Scholar
  19. — 2001. Plants in Hawaiian medicine. Bess Press, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  20. Malo, D. 1971. Hawaiian antiquities: Moolelo Hawaii, 2d ed. Translated Nathaniel B. Emerson. Bishop Museum Special Publications 2, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  21. Paul, A. 2002. Origins of the Haitian ethnopharmacopoeia. PhD. dissertation (Ecology, Evolutionary and Conservation Biology) Columbia University, New York.Google Scholar
  22. Prance, G. T., and V. Plana. 1998. The use of alien plants in tropical South American folk medicines. Pages 185–200 in H. D. V. Prendergast, N. L. Etkin; P. R. Harris, and P. J. Houghton, eds., Plants for food and medicine. Royal Botanical Gardens, KewGoogle Scholar
  23. Ragone, D. 1991. Ethnobotany of breadfruit in Poly nesia. Pages 203–220 in P. A. Cox and S. A. Banack, eds., Islands, plants, and Polynesians: An introduction to Polynesian ethnobotany. Dioscorides Press, Portland.Google Scholar
  24. Rivera, D., and C. Obon. 1995. The ethnopharmacolgy of Madeira and Porto Santo Islands, a review. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 46:73–93.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Stone C. P., and J. M. Scott. 1985. Hawaii’s terrestrial ecosystems: Preservation and management: Proceedings of a symposium held June 5–6, 1984 at Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Honolulu, Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit, University of Hawaii.Google Scholar
  26. Valier, K. 1995. Ferns of Hawaii. Univeristy of Hawaii Press, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  27. Wagner, W. L., D. R. Herbst, and S. H. Sohmer. 1999. Manual of flowering plants of Hawaii. Volumes 1 and 2. Revised Editions. Bishop Museum Press and University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu.Google Scholar
  28. Whistler, W. A. 1992. Polynesian herbal medicine. National Tropical Botanical Garden, Lawai.Google Scholar
  29. Wright, T. 1972. The disenchanted isles: The story of the second revolution in Hawaii. The Dial Press, New York.Google Scholar
  30. Yen, D. E. 1991. Polynesian cultigens and culivars: The question of origin. Pages 67–96 in P. A. Cox and S. A. Banack, eds., Islands, plants, and Polynesians: An introduction to Polynesian ethnobotany. Dioscorides Press, Portland.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Palmer Christian T. 
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The International Institute for Indigenous Resource ManagementDenver
  2. 2.Yale School of Forestry and Environmental StudiesNew Haven

Personalised recommendations