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Journal of Zhejiang University-SCIENCE A

, Volume 11, Issue 12, pp 966–971 | Cite as

Insert geometry effects on surface roughness in turning process of AISI D2 steel

  • Zahari Taha
  • Hani-kurniati Lelana
  • Hideki Aoyama
  • Raja Ariffin Raja Ghazilla
  • Julirose Gonzales
  • Novita Sakundarini
  • Sugoro B. Sutono
Article

Abstract

Surface roughness is an important parameter for ensuring that the dimension of geometry is within the permitted tolerance. The ideal surface roughness is determined by the feed rate and the geometry of the tool. However, several uncontrollable factors including work material factors, tool angle, and machine tool vibration, may also influence surface roughness. The objective of this study was to compare the measured surface roughness (from experiment) to the theoretical surface roughness (from theoretical calculation) and to investigate the surface roughness resulting from two types of insert, ‘C’ type and ‘T’ type. The experiment was focused on the turning process, using a lathe machine Colchester 6000. The feed rate was varied within the recommended feed rate range. We found that there were large deviations between the measured and theoretical surface roughness at a low feed rate (0.05 mm/r) from the application of both inserts. A work material factor of AISI D2 steel that affects the chip character is presumably responsible for this phenomenon. Interestingly, at a high feed rate (0.4 mm/r), the ‘C’ type insert resulted in 40% lower roughness compared to the ‘T’ type due to the difference in insert geometry. This study shows that the geometry of an insert may result in a different surface quality at a particular level of feed rate.

Key words

Surface roughness Turning Insert geometry Feed rate 

CLC number

TG506 

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Copyright information

© Zhejiang University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zahari Taha
    • 1
  • Hani-kurniati Lelana
    • 1
  • Hideki Aoyama
    • 2
  • Raja Ariffin Raja Ghazilla
    • 1
  • Julirose Gonzales
    • 1
  • Novita Sakundarini
    • 1
  • Sugoro B. Sutono
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Product Design and Manufacturing, Faculty of EngineeringUniversity of MalayaKuala LumpurMalaysia
  2. 2.Department of System Design Engineering, Faculty of Science and TechnologyKeio UniversityKeioJapan

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