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Steering motion control of a snake robot via a biomimetic approach

  • Wenjuan Ouyang
  • Wenyu Liang
  • Chenzui Li
  • Hui Zheng
  • Qinyuan RenEmail author
  • Ping Li
Article
  • 1 Downloads

Abstract

We propose a biomimetic approach for steering motion control of a snake robot. Inspired by a vertebrate biological motor system paradigm, a hierarchical control scheme is adopted. In the control scheme, an artificial central pattern generator (CPG) is employed to generate serpentine locomotion in the robot. This generator outputs the coordinated desired joint angle commands to each lower-level effector controller, while the locomotion can be controlled through CPG modulation by a higher-level motion controller. The motion controller consists of a cerebellar model articulation controller (CMAC) and a proportional-derivative (PD) controller. Because of the fast learning ability of the CMAC, the proposed motion controller can drive the robot to track the desired orientation and adapt to unexpected perturbations. The PD controller is employed to expedite the convergence speed of the motion controller. Finally, both numerical studies and experiments proved that the proposed approach can help the snake robot achieve good tracking performance and adaptability in a varying environment.

Key words

Snake robot Central pattern generator Cerebellar model articulation controller 

CLC number

TP242 

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Copyright information

© Zhejiang University and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Industrial Control TechnologyZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina
  2. 2.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore
  3. 3.Zhejiang University of Science and TechnologyHangzhouChina

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