Materials and Structures

, Volume 45, Issue 3, pp 309–324 | Cite as

Ultra-high performance concrete and fiber reinforced concrete: achieving strength and ductility without heat curing

  • Kay Wille
  • Antoine E. Naaman
  • Sherif El-Tawil
  • Gustavo J. Parra-Montesinos
Original Article

Abstract

Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) and ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete (UHP-FRC) were introduced in the mid 1990s. Special treatment, such as heat curing, pressure and/or extensive vibration, is often required in order to achieve compressive strengths in excess of 150 MPa (22 ksi). This study focuses on the development of UHP-FRCs without any special treatment and utilizing materials that are commercially available on the US market. Enhanced performance was accomplished by optimizing the packing density of the cementitious matrix, using very high strength steel fibers, tailoring the geometry of the fibers and optimizing the matrix-fiber interface properties. It is shown that addition of 1.5% deformed fibers by volume results in a direct tensile strength of 13 MPa, which is 60% higher than comparable UHP-FRC with smooth steel fibers, and a tensile strain at peak stress of 0.6%, which is about three times that for UHP-FRC with smooth fibers. Compressive strength up to 292 MPa (42 ksi), tensile strength up to 37 MPa (5.4 ksi) and strain at peak stress up to 1.1% were also attained 28 days after casting by using up to 8% volume fraction of high strength steel fibers and infiltrating them with the UHPC matrix.

Keywords

Bond strength Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) Reactive powder concrete (RPC) Ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete (UHP-FRC) Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) Steel fiber Flow table Spread value 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by a fellowship within the Postdoctoral-Programme of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). The second and third writers would also like to acknowledge the support of the University of Michigan and that of the National Science Foundation under grant No. CMMI 0754505. The writers also like to acknowledge the following companies for providing free material: BASF Construction Chemicals, Bekaert, Chryso Inc., Holcim (US) Inc., Elkem Materials, Grace Construction Products, Lehigh Cement Company, Sika Corporation. The opinions expressed in this paper are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsors.

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Copyright information

© RILEM 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kay Wille
    • 1
  • Antoine E. Naaman
    • 2
  • Sherif El-Tawil
    • 3
  • Gustavo J. Parra-Montesinos
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  4. 4.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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